Tuesday, March 24, 2015

131--Art Lesson Plan Rubrics

131--Lesson Plan Rubrics--Prof. J. Healy  

Criterion  
Suitability and Relevance of Museum Theme  
Performance Rating
4-Theme is engaging and lends itself to elementary art instruction
3-Theme lends itself to elementary art instruction
2-Theme is partially relevant to elementary art instruction
1-Theme is not or barely relevant to elementary art instruction  

Criterion 
Originality  
Performance Rating
4-Lesson is creative and original in design
3-Lesson is somewhat creative and original
2-Lesson is slightly creative and original
1-Lesson is not creative or original; source is from internet or art education book

 Criterion 
Appropriate Media  
Performance Rating 
4-Explores media and processes in depth
3-Explores various media and processes
2-Superficial exploration of media and processes
1-Limited materials used in lesson  

Criterion 
Format  
Performance Rating
4-Follows lesson plan form
3-Partially follows lesson plan format
2-Key aspects of lesson omitted
1-Lesson plan format ignored; most parts missing  

Criterion 
Organization and Proofreading  
Performance Rating 
4-Organized and proofread
3-Organized; some errors
2-Proofreading and/or organization lacking
1-Lesson exhibits poor language skills  
Criterion 
Developmental Appropriateness  
Performance Rating
4-Concepts of materials and activities developmentally appropriate for elementary students 3-Somewhat allied to development level of elementary students
2-Not particularly appropriate for elementary students
1-Inapproppriate for elementary students  

Criterion 
Reflects Knowledge from Reading and Class Discussions 
Performance Rating
4-Reflects knowledge from reading and discussions
3-Some reference to reading and discussions
2-Little reference to reading and discussions
1-No reference to reading or discussions

Criterion 
Artistic Objectives 
Performance Rating
4-Lessons further fundamental artistic objectives while stimulating creative individual responses
3-Lessons further fundamental artistic objectives
2-Lesson are product-oriented. Artistic objectives are unclear
1-Lessons are not artistic

Criterion 
Motivation  
Performance Rating 
4-Motivation is stimulating and on point
3-Relation between motivation and objectives is not entirely clear
2-Motivation is not well-addressed
1-Motivation is absent

Criterion 
Visuals  
Performance Rating
4-The use of visual material is an essential part of the lesson
3-Some visual material is used in lesson
2-Visual materials are poor or not relevant
1-Visuals are absent

Criterion 
Questions  
Performance Rating
4-Several questions are presented in order of increased difficulty
3-A few questions are presented in some order
2-One or two questions are presented arbitrarily
1-No questions are presented

Criterion 
Closure  
Performance Rating 
4-Closure is stimulating, clear and related to objectives
3- Closure is not entirely relevant to objectives
2-Closure is irrelevant to lesson
1-Closure is not present
Criterion 
NYS Standards  
Performance Rating
4-NYS Standards are indicated and accurate
3-NYS Standards are listed but not completely accurate
2-NYS Standards are inaccurate
1-NYS Standards are absent

Criterion 
Assessment and Rubrics  
Performance Rating
4-Assessment is authentic and specific to lesson
Rubrics are included in detail
3-Assessment is authentic
One rubric is included
2-Assessment is generic
1-Assessment is absent

Criterion 
Needs of Gifted Students  
Performance Rating
4-Lesson addresses how to differentiate instruction for gifted students
3-Lesson somewhat addresses how to differentiate instruction for gifted students
2-Lesson does not sufficiently address the needs of gifted students
1-Lesson does not address the needs of gifted students

Criterion 
Needs of Students with Special Needs
Performance Rating 
4-Lesson considers how to address needs of students with special needs
3-Lesson somewhat addresses how to differentiate instruction for students with special needs. 2-Lesson does not sufficiently address students with special needs
1-Lesson does not address students with special needs.

131 Lesson Plan Assignment

AR131—Art for Teachers of Children Professor J. Healy Art Lesson Plan Based on Your Own Original Idea—Due April 27 (optional draft due 4/13) This is a Major Assignment and will count as 20% of your semester grade. As we discussed in class, learning how to create an original and dynamic lesson plan is a key factor in being an excellent elementary art teacher. Your assignment is to write an original lesson plan. DO NOT USE A LESSON FROM THE INTERNET. THAT DEFEATS THE POINT OF LEARNING HOW TO USE YOUR OWN IDEAS. Reflect on what inspires you. What interests you. What academic subject areas would you like to bring in your classroom through art? What materials do you think are important for students to use? What skills do you want to make sure they learn? (cutting with scissors, gluing, painting, drawing, etc.). You may also start with something inspired by art or a museum visit, but it is not necessary. Ideas can come from almost anywhere. Decide how you could devise a lesson that will give children the chance to explore materials in an authentic way, yet give them a “take away” as to what inspired the lesson in the first place. You may choose to include a field trip or walk outside or in the community as part of your lesson. Think of all the various parts of a lesson we have discussed and include as many as apply to your particular lesson. The attached rubric will help guide you in this process. Be sure to list the museum, the art object or objects, the title of your lesson, the age group, your time frame for the lesson, your aims/goals, objectives (learning outcomes), New York State Standards covered, materials and tools, vocabulary you intend to introduce, your motivation, visuals you plan to use, questions you will pose in your delivery of the lesson, procedure, assessment and rubrics, closure, follow-up (if any) and how you will differentiate instruction for students with learning disabilities as well as gifted students. I have posted a complete list of the elements you need to include on the here. Also refer to the rubrics sheet. If you leave things out, you will not get an “A.” Make your lesson plan like a detailed “recipe” of sorts. It should be clear enough so that a teacher familiar with the techniques and materials you use should be able to teach it. Pay attention to grammar and spelling. Always proofread your work! If you have any small images of your visuals, you may include those, as well. If you want to include a sample of the project, you may do so. Be prepared to present your lesson to the class on April 27.

130 Museum Lesson Plan Assignment

AR130—Art for Teachers of Children Professor J. Healy Lesson Plan Based on Your Museum Trip—Due April 27 (optional draft due 4/13) This is a Major Assignment and will count as 20% of your semester grade. As we discussed in class, learning how to create an original and dynamic lesson plan is a key factor in being an excellent elementary art teacher. Your assignment is to write an original lesson plan, based on your museum trip. DO NOT USE A LESSON FROM THE INTERNET. THAT DEFEATS THE POINT OF LEARNING HOW TO USE YOUR OWN IDEAS. After going to the museum, reflect on the various things you saw that inspired you. It may be the architecture, a grouping of art works or an individual piece. Ideas can come from almost anywhere. Decide how you could devise a lesson that will give children the chance to explore materials in an authentic way, yet give them a “take away” as to what inspired the lesson in the first place. You may choose to include a museum field trip as part of your lesson. Think of all the various parts of a lesson we have discussed and include as many as apply to your particular lesson. The attached rubric will help guide you in this process. Be sure to list the museum, the art object or objects, the title of your lesson, the age group, your time frame for the lesson, your aims/goals, objectives (learning outcomes), New York State Standards covered, materials and tools, vocabulary you intend to introduce, your motivation, visuals you plan to use, questions you will pose in your delivery of the lesson, procedure, assessment and rubrics, closure, follow-up (if any) and how you will differentiate instruction for students with learning disabilities as well as gifted students. I have posted a complete list of the elements you need to include on the blog. Also refer to the rubrics sheet. Make your lesson plan like a detailed “recipe” of sorts. It should be clear enough so that an art teacher familiar with the techniques and materials you use should be able to teach it. Pay attention to grammar and spelling. Always proofread your work! If you have any small images of your visuals, you may include those, as well. If you want to include a sample of the project, you may do so. Be prepared to present your lesson on April 27.

130--Museum Lesson Plan Rubrics

Criterion

Suitability and Relevance of Museum Theme

Performance Rating

4-Themes is engaging, stems from a museum visit and lends itself to elementary art instruction

3-Theme stems from a museum visit and lends itself to elementary art instruction

2-Theme stems from a museum visit and is partially relevant to elementary art instruction

1-Theme does not stem for a museum visit and is partially relevant to elementary art instruction


Criterion

Originality

Performance Rating

4-Lesson is creative and original in design.

3-Lesson is somewhat creative and original.

2-Lesson is slightly creative and original.

1-Lesson is not creative or original; source is from internet or art education book.


Criterion

Appropriate Media

Performance Rating

4-Explores media and processes in depth

3-Explores various media and processes

2-Superficial exploration of media and processes

1-Limited materials used in lesson


Criterion

Format

Performance Rating

4-Follows lesson plan form

3-Partially follows lesson plan format

2-Key aspects of lesson omitted

1-Lesson plan format ignored; most parts missing


Criterion

Organization and Proofreading

Performance Rating

4-Organized and proofread

3-Organized; some errors

2-Proofreading and/or organization lacking

1-Lesson exhibits poor language skills


Criterion

Developmental Appropriateness

Performance Rating

4-Concepts of materials and activities developmentally appropriate for elementary students

3-Somewhat allied to development level of elementary students

2-Not particularly appropriate for elementary students

1-Inapproppriate for elementary students


Criterion

Reflects Knowledge from Reading and Class Discussions


Performance Rating 

4-Reflects knowledge from reading and discussions

3-Some reference to reading and discussions

2-Little reference to reading and discussions

1-No reference to reading or discussions


Criterion

Artistic Objectives 

Performance Rating

4-Lessons further fundamental artistic objectives while stimulating creative individual responses.

3-Lessons further fundamental artistic objectives.

2-Lesson are product-oriented. Artistic objectives are unclear.

1-Lessons are not artistic.
 

Criterion

Motivation


Performance Rating 

4-Motivation is stimulating and on point.

3-Relation between motivation and objectives is not entirely clear.

2-Motivation is not well-addressed.

1-Motivation is absent.


Criterion

Visuals 

Performance Rating

4-The use of visual material is an essential part of the lesson.

3-Some visual material is used in lesson.

2-Visual materials are poor or not relevant.

1-Visuals are absent. 


Criterion

Questions

Performance Rating

4-Several questions are presented in order of increased difficulty.

3-A few questions are presented in some order.

2-One or two questions are presented arbitrarily.

1-No questions are presented.


Criterion

Closure

Performance Rating

4-Closure is stimulating, clear and related to objectives.

3- Closure is not entirely relevant to objectives.

2-Closure is irrelevant to lesson.

1-Closure is not present. 


Criterion 

NYS Standards

Performance Rating

4-NYS Standards are indicated and accurate.

3-NYS Standards are listed but not completely accurate.

2-NYS Standards are inaccurate.

1-NYS Standards are absent. 


Criterion

Assessment and Rubrics

Performance Rating

4-Assessment is authentic and specific to lesson. Rubrics are included in detail.

3-Assessment is authentic. One rubric is included.

2-Assessment is generic.

1-Assessment is absent. 


Criterion

Needs of Gifted Students

Performance Rating

4-Lesson addresses how to differentiate instruction for gifted students.

3-Lesson somewat addresses how to differentiate instruction for gifted students.

2-Lesson does not sufficiently address the needs of gifted students.

1-Lesson does not address the needs of gifted students. 


Criterion

Needs of Students with Special Needs

Performance Rating

4-Lesson considers how to address needs of students with special needs.

3-Lesson somewhat addresses how to differentiate instruction for students with special needs.

2-Lesson does not sufficiently address students with special needs.

1-Lesson does not address students with special needs.

         

Monday, March 23, 2015

131 Storyteller Dolls Lesson Plan

Storyteller Dolls are a traditional craft of the Jimez Tribe in the Southwestern United States. Usually they feature a seated woman with an open mouth telling a story to groups of tiny children who are sprinkled on her lap and around her.

This lesson is great for Library Week or to encourage reading and being read to. A display in the school library is a nice idea.

Grades: 3 and Up

Time Frame: 2-3 art periods

Materials and Tools:
Session One: Self-hardening Clay, water containers, clay tools (plastic cutlery, old pencils, sticks, etc.)
Session Two and Three: Acrylic Paint, brushes, water cans

Obviously, if you have access to a kiln, you should use real clay and fire the dolls. Glaze with earth colors, letting the red or white clay be part of the pieces.

Motivation/Visuals:
Examples of "real" Storyteller Dolls
Talk about the difference of telling a story and reading a story. Excite the children by having them imagine who (or what) will be all around them. Their family? Friends? Pets?

Vocabulary:
three-dimensional, narrative, Native Americans, texture, pattern

NYS Standards: 1,2,3,4

Procedure:
Session One: Show students examples of the storyteller dolls and ask them about the people (or animals) they might want to tell or read stories to. Talk about crafts and what tradition means.

Demonstrate how to make a star by pulling it out of the clay and form a sitting figure. Give the figure shoes and have the arms wrap around front. Make a book and attach it to the arms by scratching, wetting and sticking both sides of what is being attached. (Clay shrinks and pieces will fall off in the drying process otherwise.)

Using a stick or pencil, push in to form an open mouth and pinch or draw facial details, hair and clothing. The make your tiny figures and add them everywhere and anywhere. Just remember to scratch, wet and stick both sides when attaching them. Let dry.

Session Two: Show students
pictures again and talk about the patterns and designs on the clothing and jewelry. Demonstrate proper painting technique (washing your brush between colors, wiping on the insurance policy (damp sponge or damp paper towels, folded) to make sure the paint is off. Have them be mindful of choosing the right brush for the job. Make sure they paint the back, as well.

Assessment:
Create a rubric chart if you need to assess the work. Things like: "Doll is 3-dimensional and looks good from all sides" and student has added facial details to the children and pets" might be examples.

Closure/Reflection:
Share the work in some fashion and have students write about the project if you want to. Display the work, if possible.

Follow-Up:
Students could do another clay lesson with more complexity (Make your family, for instance), or they could write a story that the doll could be reading.

Special Needs:
If you have gifted students, encourage them to make more than one doll or have them make the  children all reading books, too.

With learning disabled students, break the lesson down in steps, if necessary. They might need attaching help and be sure they watch your demonstration at the beginning.

Another Storyteller Doll Image

131-Image for Storyteller Doll

Monday, March 16, 2015

Pop-Up Book Cover How-to Photos



Top photo shows tracing around edges of cardboard, leaving a space for the spine of book in between the pieces. Middles is the cut out piece of paper--remember--envelope flaps on each side with a clean corner. Bottom is taped sides and finished cover, ready to have the insides put in and glued.

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Max Ernst-Inspired Collages Lesson Plan-131



Max Ernst-Inspired Collage
Grades 4 and Up
Time Frame: 2 art periods
This project is inspired by collages by the Surrealist Max Ernst.

Aims:
• To explore the collage process
• To use old illustrations to create impossible scenes
• To create individual works that express absurdity, nightmares, the occult, etc.

Materials: Black paper or backgrounds from collected sources, copied, old illustrations from 19th Century books and ads copied, scissors, glue sticks, old phone books or magazines for gluing

Vocabulary: Surrealism, collage, overlapping, edge

Procedure: Give students pages of images to choose from. Students will make either their own backgrounds or start with one from your collection of images. (Ask me for a packet of originals to copy, if you are interested.) Show good cutting technique, by making clean edged cuts. Have your students move the paper, not their wrists! Show how to plan by working from the back forward. Demonstrate good gluing technique by putting your shape upside down on a page of the phone book and gluing around the edges of the shape. (The middle takes care of itself!) Smack down for a tight, clean bond and throw the page of the phone book away. Repeat for each shape. This way, no glue gets on the table and you get clean gluing.

Reflection/Follow-up: Share the work. Perhaps you can make a class quilt with one work by each student being put together in rows.